Thursday, March 1, 2018

New Shrubs for 2018

Pollypetite® Rose of Sharon, Hibiscus sp. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

You'll notice that "dwarf" is a recurring descriptive in this post. Smaller yards mean that gardeners are looking for small-scale shrubs and growers have responded with new dwarf versions of classic favourites.

I'm opening with this dwarf Rose of Sharon. If you dislike this kind of shrub for having a plethora of unwanted seedlings, you'll be glad to hear that the new Pollypetite® is nearly seedless.


Pollypetite® Rose of Sharon, Hibiscus sp. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

And how pretty does its cool pink blooms look paired with this greenish-white hydrangea? (quite possibly a BoBo® hydrangea paniculata– a 2017 introduction)

Pollypetite® Rose of Sharon, Hibiscus sp. has a rounded, wide habit. In summer it's loaded with lavender-pink blooms floating over handsome dark blue-green foliage.

Full sun
Moisture: average
Deer resistant
Blooms on new wood  (prune in early spring)
Height: 36 - 48 Inches
Spread: 48 - 60 Inches
USDA zones: 5-9

The feathery pink plumes of "smoke" are  fine hairs on infertile flowers.

I have wanted a purple smokebush (cotinus) for ages, but they can grow to reach epic proportions. Where on earth could I squeeze a large shrub like this into my already crowded garden?

Their clouds of pink "smoke" in mid-summer are a nice feature, but what I really like is their deep maroon colored foliage.

 Winecraft Black®, Cotinus coggygria. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

Winecraft Black®, Cotinus coggygria  Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

So I'm super excited to see Proven Winners® is now offering a dwarf cultivar. Maybe I can finally fit a smokebush in somewhere!

Winecraft Black®, Cotinus coggygria has round leaves that are a rich purple in the spring. As summer heats up, the leaves turn a deep near-black tone. In the fall, the foliage turns an array of reds and oranges. Soft panicles of bloom appear in spring and become the misty "smoke". Unlike older cultivars, this smokebush has a rounded, dwarf habitWinecraft Black® smokebush is very easy to care for and requires little to nothing in the way of regular maintenance.

Full sun
Soil: average Moisture: average
Deer and rabbit resistant
Blooms on new wood
Height: 48 - 72 Inches
Spread: 48 - 72 Inches
USDA zones: 4-8

On the left is a Pugstar Blue® Butterfly Bush. In the middle is Pugstar White®. On the right is Pugstar Pink®. Photos courtesy of Proven Winners® 

Pugster Periwinkle®. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

I seem to have terrible luck over-wintering Butterfly Bushes. This Pugstar® series offers increased cold hardiness and full sized flowers on a dwarf-sized shrub. Dare I try one?

Pugster® butterfly bushes are the first to offer large, dense blooms on a small frame. They bloom from summer through frost without deadheading. The thick, heavy stems of Pugster® butterfly bushes ensure better hardiness in cold areas.

Full sun
Soil: well-drained Moisture: low
Deer and rabbit resistant
Blooms on new wood
Height: 36-48 Inches
Spread: 24-36 Inches
USDA zones: 5-9

Festivus Gold® Ninebark Physocarpus opulifolius. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

Festivus Gold® Ninebark Physocarpus opulifolius. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

I already have four Ninebark shrubs in my garden. This new cultivar, with its striking yellow foliage, tempts me to consider adding yet another.

Festivus Gold® Ninebark Physocarpus opulifolius has a semi-dwarf habit and yellow-green foliage. Even in full sun, the foliage stays bright and is free from the fungal diseases that plague other varieties. In spring, the entire plant is covered in white flower clusters. Ninebark are native to North America, so they are extra tough and adaptable to various sites and soils. Once established, they are quite drought tolerant, but will benefit from a layer of shredded bark mulch. 

Full sun (6-8 hrs.)
Soil: average Moisture: average
Blooms on old wood (It's best to avoid any kind of regular trimming or pruning of ninebarks. However, dead wood may be removed in spring. Should further pruning be required, do so immediately after flowering is finished.) 
Height: 48 - 60 Inches
Spread: 36 - 48 Inches
USDA zones: 3-7 

 Invincibelle Mini Mauvette® (left picture) and in the centre (right picture). 
Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

Invincibelle Mini Mauvette®. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

I have a pale pink Invincibelle Spirit®, which I absolutely love, so of course this new introduction caught my eye.

Invincibelle Mini Mauvette® hydrangea blooms every single year, even in cold climates. It's the same type of hydrangea as the classic and much-loved 'Annabelle' but instead of plain white blooms, the flowers are a deep pink-mauve. The stems are strong and sturdy, so the flowers don't flop. It blooms in early summer, and continues through to frost. 

Part sun to sun (minimum of 6 hrs. of sun)
Moisture: average (Mulch recommended to help conserve water)
Blooms on  new wood (Prune in early spring. Cut the entire plant by one-third its total height)
Height: 30-36 Inches
Spread: 36 - 48 Inches
USDA zones: 3-9 

There is also a white option. Invincibelle Wee White®Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

A full sized Doublefile Viburnum. Private garden in Toronto.

Up next is yet another dwarf (I warned you it would be a recurring theme!)

A traditional Doublefile Viburnum (seen above) is a glorious thing, but again, it is enormous. The new Wabi-Sabi® Doublefile viburnum Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum (seen below) is a lot smaller.

Wabi-Sabi® Doublefile viburnum Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum
Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

To be honest, I don't think this new cultivar would have quite the same drama as the full-sized Doublefile viburnum, but its modest proportions allows Wabi-Sabi®  to step out of the background and become a shrub you might use at the front of your garden.

Wabi-Sabi® Doublefile viburnum Viburnum plicatum var. tomentosum grows low and wide, making it perfect for the front of beds, planting atop walls, or lining walkways. Every branch bears large, pure white lacecap flowers. Like all viburnums, it is somewhat shade tolerant. Plant in well-drained soil and sun to part sun for best results. 

Part sun to sun
Soil: average, well-drained  Moisture: average
Deer and rabbit resistant
Blooms on old wood (Pruning should not be required regularly, but if you wish to prune, do so after flowering. )
Height: 24 - 36 Inches
Spread: 48 - 60 Inches
USDA zones: 5-8

Czechmark® Trilogy (left) and Czechmark® TwoPink (right)
Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

Czechmark Sunny Side Up™ Weigela. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

Czechmark Sunny Side Up™ Weigela. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

The Czechmark® series of shrubs promises heavier blooming than a typical weigela. Czechmark Sunny Side Up™ Weigela caught my attention for its white flowers and its apple-green leaves. And look how pretty it looks in a mass planting (see above)

There are also two pink cultivars; Czechmark® Trilogy and Czechmark® TwoPink (also see above). 
Plant in full sun for the very best floral display, but a little light shade isn't too harmful, particularly in hotter climates.

Sun 
Soil: average Moisture: average 
Deer and rabbit resistant
Blooms on old wood
Height: 36-54 Inches
Spread: 36-54 Inches
USDA zones: 4-8 

Tandoori Orange® Viburnum dilatatum. Photo courtesy of Proven Winners® 

This is not a sponsored blog post. I have showcased new introductions that appealed to me personally in hopes you might be interested in them too. 

Even though I famously write ridiculously long blogs, there are more new shrubs than even I dare include in a single post. You can check them out by visiting Provenwinners.com.

Bookmark this post with a Pin.

14 comments:

  1. Although there's a couple others I like, by far my favourite -- of your favourite new shrubs is ...
    [drumroll please]
    Invincibelle Wee White :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like that one too...although I'd like to see how the flowers age before I buy one. Sometimes white flowers go brown and look unattractive. One of the things I do like about Wee White is its tiny size. I can think of lots of places I could plant it.

      Delete
  2. I look forward to every spring when announcements are made about new hybrids coming out. The Pollypetite Rose of Sharon and the Invincibelle 'Wee White' are looking very enticing for smaller spaces. Thanks for the informative post! I can't wait to see these in the nurseries.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will definitely be checking out some of these shrubs myself Lee!

      Delete
  3. Hello Jennifer .. I ordered Winecraft because I love the darker colours and having Royal Purple along with a few other dark shrubs .. just makes me want more of them for contrast in the garden .. smaller is better for me as well .. I was looking at the Pugster line as well .. new shrubs are great fun to see, but entice me far too much for my own good ? LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For some woman it's shoes. For me it's plants! LOL! I seem to have no problem spending money on new plants. I'd definitely like to try the new Winecraft. Smoke bushes have such great color and I've wanted one for ages.

      Delete
  4. What a beautiful selection, Jennifer!
    I have the perfect places for two of those little Rose of Sharons. I never knew that they were anything but the great big ones (which I also love).

    Thank you so much!!

    Have a wonderful week!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't seen anything like the dwarf Rose of Sharon before. They are tempting, aren't they?

      Delete
  5. Viburnums, Buddleia, Hydrangea, Cotinus, I love them all, in fact I will be planting some of them soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I envy you that Alistair. The snow flurries are still flying here and planting opportunities are still weeks away!

      Delete
  6. Wonderful new ideas! Now where can I fit a new shrub border? Hmmmm.....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's always my dilemma. Where can I put all the new stuff I want each spring! LOL!

      Delete
  7. Dwarf versions of old classics are very intriguing. The mini mauvette hydrangea is gorgeous, especially in a grouping. The Polypetite rose of Sharon is well, adorable.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, they are very tempting, aren't they? I am a sucker for a pretty hydrangea in particular.

      Delete

I love to hear from you. Thanks for leaving a comment.