Tuesday, June 16, 2015

More Pretty Pockets


I would complain about the lack of rain in the last post I did on my garden. Now it seems to do nothing, but rain. That's it! No more grumbling about the weather!

Even though the downpours have kept me indoors, the garden is better for the rain. That is something to be grateful for.


Last summer I grew these Lupins from seed and now I think I'm hooked on growing lupins.

I started them in one of my nursery beds with the idea of planting them out into the garden once they matured, but things did not go entirely to plan. The first lupins I attempted to move wilted horribly. Slowly they are coming back from the brink of disaster.  I decided to leave the rest in the nursery bed for now.

In future, I think will have to grow them in their final position in the garden or start them in small pots so the roots are less disturbed when they are transplanted.

I still have a lot to learn about growing lupins. 

They like slightly acid, free-draining soil that is on the poor side. My soil isn't very acidic, but they seem to have done well enough.


I have been trying to show different areas of the garden in each post.
This is one of the views just inside the back gate.


Giant White Fleece Flower, Persicaria Polymorpha is one of those plants I love because it is so tall. Mine is in part shade, but usually you see it growing in full sun. One drawback: the flowers have a mild, but unpleasant smell. Height: 90-120 cm (35-47 inches), Spread: 80-90 cm (31-35 inches). Average to moist conditions. Zones: USDA 3-9


 


The Sweet Rocket has started to fade and is setting seed.


Anemone canadensis is an aggressive spreader, but lucky for me I planted it in an area where it can only go so far. It has single white flowers in June.  This anemone likes normal to moist conditions and soil that is rich inorganic matter. Part shade. Height: 30-60 cm (11-22 inches). USDA Zones: 4-8.


They are almost finished, but you can still see a few white and purple Japanese Irises.



I don't know if you remember this picture. 

This is the little garden retreat we started in late summer 2013. The plan was to build a gazebo and this gravel courtyard was phase 1.


Here we are in 2015. Call this phase 2.

We installed a temporary gazebo until we have the time and money to build the permanent structure. The red adirondack chairs moved out onto the lawn into a circle around our fire pit. My old wicker furniture moved in. To freshen things up, I added a few new pillows.

The temporary gazebo keeps off the rain and gives us a little extra shade when the sun shines. The canvas top also stops black walnuts from dropping on our heads!

These Columbine have been so pretty I hope you will forgive me a another picture of them.



The tag on this plant reads"Patio Clematis." I am sorry to have nothing more specific about the cultivar. I really like the short height (around 5ft). They are prefect for a small plant support or obelisk.


This white Clematis 'Hyde Hall' continues to put on a great show.

Meadow Rue slumped down in the rain.


The first of my peonies have been weighed down to the ground with all the rain we've had.





My poor white peonies! 


I grabbed some scissors and picked bunches for the house.


My favourite pink peonies are yet to come....

30 comments:

  1. Are the pink peonies in the last 2 photos Sarah Bernhardt? Lovely garden! Someday...

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    1. These are all peonies I inherited when we bought the house. They are unnamed, but I am pretty sure they are not Sarah Bernhardt. I have some Sarah Bernhardt, but they are mostly closed still. They're lovely and my most favourite.

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  2. What fabulous photos, Jennifer, and I'm envious of your lupins. I've had several attempts to grow them but at some point the snails move in and devour them! Peonies are such beautiful flowers, mine are just coming into bloom. Your pink flower looks quite a deep shade for Sarah Bernhardt, could it be Albert Crousse or Madelon?

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    1. The dark magenta peonies are definitely not Sarah Bernhardt. I inherited them from the previous homeowner and unfortunately I don't know the cultivar.
      I noticed that the pink Sarah B.'s have opened in the back garden when I took a walk through this evening. They are my favourites!

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  3. I tried to grow Lupins years ago with no luck, too warm here I think. I also had Persicaria which I loved but had to give it to my sister-in-law because it got too big for my narrow walkway. The rich color of that magenta peony is beautiful.

    Eileen

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  4. Beautiful photos of your beautiful blooms Jennifer! I had to go over them again just to take in all the beauty!

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  5. Your peonies are so beautiful, such wonderful flowers. Do yours have a lovely perfume too?

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    1. I notice the scent especially when I bring bouquets indoors. The white ones seem particularly fragrant.

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  6. I adore the scent of Persicaria polymorpha - I think it smells like buckwheat honey! Mum had the best luck with her lupins in Quebec growing in clay soil - in my sandy soil they lived for a couple of years and then pooped out. It's one of those lovely flowers that in our neck of the woods needs replacing - I'm thinking that it's time for me to find a spot and commit to collecting seed and poking a few in every other year or so. Great Thalictrum photo! My cursory inspection yesterday - it's a big mess of water obviously was too quick - am going to have another look this a.m. B.

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  7. Rain or no rain, your garden is always amazing! I'm so jealous of your peonies!! I think they are on my must grow list for next year. Perhaps in a nursery bed as you said to start them.

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  8. Oh my....you have a new follower.Your garden is so beautiful.I hope mine is going to look like yours in a few years.I love your Lupins,I could have them everywhere in my garden too.Your peonies are amazing.Mine have bloomed already.Thanks for sharing your wonderful pictures.Have a great week.
    Hugs
    Caroline

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  9. You have a beautiful garden, Jennifer. Love your Phase 2, which would be a wonderful place to sit even if you never progressed to the next phase.

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  10. Heavy rain does beat the poor plants up! Your peonies are gorgeous, I hope a little sun dries them out! We are in urgent need of rain too, the right sort mind!
    Your garden retreat looks heavenly! Gosh, I thought that was the final deal, it would certainly do me, it must be lovely sitting there. You do have a lovely garden. I'm glad your lupins recovered.xxx

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  11. I am definitely living in the wrong place. Peonies, Lupin and rain...plus that glorious green, green grass. The garden looks wonderful and your new seating area is fantastic. Enjoy all of this beauty and especially the rain, I have almost forgotten what rain is.

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  12. These photos are so beautiful, Jennifer!
    I too just love lupines, and we had some real beauties this year. They are beginning to fade fast now though. My peonies were beautiful for about 2 days, and then we had some really heavy rains, so they became history pretty quickly.

    Thank you for sharing all of these wonderful images here!

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  13. I have just been browsing through your blog, what a beautiful garden you have, just the sort I like. Great photography too.As for those peonies, they are heavenly.

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  14. I have not had success with lupines, so I will watch for updates. Do you have trouble with your Sweet Rocket becoming invasive? I love the soft colors and how it looks like garden phlox, but flowers earlier in the season. However, after reading so many warnings about it, and how it can't even be sold in some states, I'm worried I'll be getting into something I can't control. I've had such a hard time trying to get rid of a certain type of anemone that strangles my other plants. I don't see meadow rue on many garden blogs, but it is such a good plant in the garden and in bouquets. Your photos are beautiful. Your garden is beautiful!

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    1. Sweet Rocket is a very good self-seeder. Here is how I control it: after it flowers I remove most of the plants and leave a few to set seeds. (Sweet Rocket is a biennial) I find it is prone to mildew, so that is another reason the remove most of it (particularly in crowded beds where air circulation isn't the best).
      Sweet Rocket is fairly easy to yank out as it has a shallow root system (although I wear gloves as the main stem is a tiny bit prickly). I love Sweet Rocket's color and pleasant scent. I think it adds a lot to the garden at this time of year.
      I good comparative plant would be Forget-me-nots. If you think Forget-me-nots (another biennial) are more bother than they are worth, then you probably will feel the same about Sweet Rocket. (I yank out most of the Forget-me-nots too and leave only a few to set seed. I think Forget-me-nots make a nice understory for bulbs.)

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  15. Your blooms are looking lovely Jennifer! I love your "temporary" gazebo. It looks like a lovely place to get out of the summer heat and enjoy your garden at the same time.

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  16. Like always it's gorgeous in your garden. And your photography is stunning.

    Oh Jennifer, where on earth did you get Annemone Canadensis? When I ask any nursery around here, they just look at me with a blank stare as if I am taking, well....a different language. It's about the only time I wish I lived back in White Rock, lol.

    Lupins, I have the perfect soil for those babies...now why didn't I think of that sooner!

    Jen

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  17. Such lovely blooms - and the garden does enjoy rain, but alas it can sometimes rain too much!

    Love your lupins they look great in a cottage garden setting, but all your plants look good. I always have to go and have another look at them - wonderful.

    All the best Jan .

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  18. I am here from Jen's blog and I enjoyed viewing all your gorgeous flowers. Love Lupins and Peonies! Our Peonies did not bloom this year which was odd.

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  19. Anemone canadensis is both bane and beauty. It even grows and thrives in dry shade and has suffocated many of my plants. I pull it out by the handfuls every year but only remove the top growth. The roots are there forever. It's such a thug. I think your temporary gazebo is pretty nice! Looks like a great place to unwind at the end of the day. :o)

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  20. I seriously have no idea how I missed this post!!! Oh Jennifer! The layered beds and stunning blooms just took my breath away! Your gazebo area is amazing! Such a glorious spot to enjoy the garden and your lupines are fantastic!!! Have you ever read the book Miss Rumphius?? It is a childrens book about a woman who makes the world more beautiful by spreading lupine seeds. Just reminded me of you! Thank you for sharing your inspiring space my friend! Nicole xoxo

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  21. These are all gorgeous, Jennifer! Have a lovely summertime. :)

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  22. Jennifer, everything looks so beautiful! Your photographs always amaze me. I love your little red birdhouse peeking out!

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  23. Everything is beyond beautiful. I love, love, love seeing photos of your own personal garden.

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  24. I love what you show of your garden. Beautiful plants, lovely design and stunning photos.

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  25. I love lupines. I had hoped to plant some this Spring but I let time get away from this year. But I had read that lupines to not like to be transplanted because they have large tap root. Your flowers are stunning and your gazebo right now is pretty cool.

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  26. My your garden is stunning and blooming happy Jennifer and I love that temp gazebo project.

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