Sunday, April 27, 2014

Joe's Garden: Part 1


As I sat down to write this post, I tried to think of the perfect adjective to describe Joe and the word "gentleman" sprang to mind. Joe is a gentleman in the most traditional sense of the word. Retired for a number of years now, he is a petite, shy man. He is also a serious plant collector, who weather permitting, can't wait to rush out the door each morning to work in his garden.

A regular feature on garden tours and open on a number of occasions each summer, Joe's garden is probably one of the city's best known private gardens. Like so many of the gardens I share, this garden is a labour of love. There are over 6000 plants that are tended with the greatest care. As you will see, the flowerbeds are all meticulously groomed and edged with exacting precision.


The drawing above is a very rough layout of the garden. Pathways take you down either side of the house and into the backyard. Right outside the back door there is a garden of roses and perennials. Just beyond that is a swimming pool and deck area. Toward the back of the property there are two symmetrical gardens with a central area of lawn in each. Then, back through a series of rose covered arches, is a potting area.


Let's take a stroll, shall we, starting off on the path to the right of the garage.

Astilbe chinensis var. taquetii, 'Superba': Feathery magenta pink flowers in early summer. Height: 90-120, Spread: 60-75 cm  Part shade to shade. Average to moist growing conditions. Normal, sandy and clay soils are fine. USDA Zones: 3-9 


For now, we will take a quick glance at the rose garden. In an upcoming post, we will come back for another look at the roses.



Hydrangea 'Annabelle': Height: 1.2- 1.8 m Spread: 1.2- 1.8 m. Average to medium well-drained soil. Intolerant of drought. Blooms on new wood and should be pruned in late winter to encourage strong new growth. USDA Zones 4-9.



Hydrangea 'Invincibelle Pink Annabelle': Height: 100 cm, Spread: 100 cm Sun or shade. Flowers June to September with deadheading.


Musk Mallow, Malva: Full sun. Height: 45-70 cm, Spread: 45-60cm. Average growing conditions. Normal, sandy or clay soil. Satiny, single hibiscus-like flowers in early summer. Cutting back the plant in August will encourage it to over winter better and survive longer. Readily self-seeds. USDA Zones 3-9.



A mix of perennials including several hosta, a Brunnera, a Heuchera and a Pulmonaria.


Astrantia major 'Roma': Average to moist soil and part shade to sun are best for Astrantia. Height: 60-90 cm, Spread: 45-60, USDA Zones: 3-9


A lovely combination:

European Meadowsweet, Filipendula ulmaria has ferny foliage and flowers similar to an Astilbe. Plants form a bushy clump with creamy-white flowers in early summer. This plant does best in moist soil in sun or part shade. Trim flowers after they bloom. Height 75-120 cm, Spread: 45-60 cm. USDA Zones 3-9

Astrantia major 'Roma': Average to moist soil and part shade to sun are best for Astrantia. Height: 60-90 cm, Spread: 45-60, USDA Zones: 3-9

Phlox Paniculata 'David's Lavender': Full sun or part shade. Height: 90-120 cm Spread: 60-75 Moist to average growing conditions are best. Sandy or clay soil.  Fragrant. USDA Zones 3-9.


Joe has an array of hostas that would be the envy of most gardeners. He combines them in groups and also mixes them in usual ways as he has done with these Carefree Delight Roses.



 

Coreopsis blooms for weeks and is a great self-seeder.





Variegated Japanese Knotweed, Fallopia japonicaVariegata: Joe has the free time to be vigilant with his perennials. Based on my own experiences, I would be very cautious of planting any Knotweeds! Maybe this is one plant that is best grown in a container. Morning sun or part shade. Height: 150-180 cm, Spread: 90-120 cm. Part shade. Average to moist growing conditions are best. Normal, sandy or clay soil. USDA Zones 2-9.

Hosta 'Sun Power': This variety of hosta has large chartreuse to gold foliage. Height: 70-75 cm, Spread: 120-150cm. Part shade. Average to moist growing conditions are best. Normal, sandy or clay soil. USDA Zones 2-9.



Phlox Paniculata 'David's Lavender': Full sun or part shade. Height: 90-100 cm Spread: 60-75.  Fragrant. Average to moist growing conditions are best. Sandy or clay soil. Resistant to powdery mildew. USDA Zones 3-9.



Echinacea 'Double Scoop Bubblegum': Height: 60-65 cm, Spread: 40-55 cm. Full sun. Average, dry or moist growing conditions. Normal, sandy or clay soils work. Attractive to butterflies. USDA Zones 4-9.

False Mallow, Sidalcea 'Party Girl': Is a personal favourite of mine. Height: 60-90 cm, Spread: 30-45 cm. Full sun or part shade. Blooms early summer, and with deadheading, again in the fall. Average or moist growing conditions. Normal, sandy or clay soils are fine. They self-seed, but not to the point of becoming a nuisance. USDA Zones 4-9.


Phlox Paniculata 'David's Lavender': Full sun or part shade. Height: 90-120 cm Spread: 60-75. Moist growing conditions are best. Sandy or clay soil. USDA Zones 3-9.




Yellow Fumitory, Corydalis lutea: Height: 20-40 cm, Spread: 25-30 cmPart to full shade. Nice ferny foliage and pretty yellow flowers from June into fall. Average to moist growing conditions. Readily self-seeds, but seedlings are easy to pull. USDA Zones: 3-9

Creeping Thyme, Thymus 'Doone ValleyHeight: 5-10 cm, Spread: 30-60 cm. Full sun. Needs well-drained soil. Average to dry growing conditions.


Trumpet Creeper, Campsis radocans: Trumpet Creeper can reach a height of up to 40' and can spread as much a 10'. In other words, it is a pretty aggressive vine that is hard to control. Full sun to part shade. Easily grown in moist soils. Blooms on new growth so spring pruning is not a problem. Attractive to Hummingbirds. USDA Zones: 4-9


Hybrid Mullein, Verbascum chaixii Height: 40-55 cm, Spread:3--45 cm. Full sun. Average to dry growing conditions. Well-drained normal, sandy or clay soils are fine. Plants flower for a long period and tend to exhaust themselves, so it is a good idea to take cuttings in spring to make new plants. USDA Zones: 5-9



Sneezeweed, Helenium autumnale 'Moerheim Beauty': Height: 75-100 cm, Spread: 45-60 cm. Full sun. Average to Moist growing conditions. Plant likes fertile, well-drained soil. Pinch back in June for a fuller, shorter plant. Attractive to butterflies. USDA Zones 4-9.




Trumpet Lilies by the back door.



This Climbing Hydrangea is only about 5 or 6 years old! 

Climbing Hydrangea, Hydrangea anomala petiolaris: is a large deciduous vine that can reach as much as 50 ft at maturity.  In early summer this vine produces lacy, flat-topped flowers 5 inches or more in width. Shade, part shade or sun if well watered. Plant in rich, well-drained, moisture retentive soil. One drawback is they are slow growers and can take years to really get going. Once established they do grow more quickly and may need pruning in summer after they flower. USDA Zones 4-7

Here's a link to Joe's Garden Part 2

Bookmark this post with a Pin.

32 comments:

  1. Good old Joe what a plant packed garden and so beautifully and lovingly tended - it is obvious that you can enjoy gardening well into old age and do it well.

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  2. I love this garden and the planting style. It takes a special person to plan, plant and maintain a garden like this, packed with colour and texture, yet always kept in check to the right extent. So interesting, and such a lot to learn and be inspired by in your photos !

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  3. Lovely garden, with pretty plant combinations.

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  4. The garden is magnificent, so many different plants put together to create a place, that you just want to be in.

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  5. Get out of here!!! That climbing hydrangea is only 5 years old!!!!! Holy cow! I should just say holy cow about the entire space though! My goodness where in the world do I even begin! His love for gardening is so very evident in every beautiful photo that you took Jennifer! He just has an amazing eye for layering colors...it is fresh and exciting! And you are so right...he uses hostas in such a fun way! What an outstanding garden and gardener!!! I hope that you have a lovely week ahead friend! Nicole xo

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  6. Absolutely gorgeous! What a joy it must be seeing it for real.

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  7. Stunning! You always find the most wonderful gardens. Such an inspiration.

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  8. What gorgeous combinations of colors and textures! From the layout, I thought his garden must be rather small, but whether that is deceiving or it's just that Joe has packed every square inch full of plants, this is a fantastic garden. No wonder it's so popular for garden tours.

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  9. What a beautiful garden! I'm so glad that I found your blog. Un fortunately, I don't remember how I finally arrived here, but once again, very happy. Thank you for the visit! Martine
    http://jardin-alsace-vignoble.blogspot.fr/

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    1. Oh yes, forgot to tell you that I've placed a link to your garden on my blog.

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  10. Sigh, so beautiful.... love all the brick pathways, too.

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  11. Wow, impressive is an understatement. How amazing would it be to walk through his yard in person?! I was pinning photo after photo. :) I loved that the majority of the plants were familiar and easily grown in my own backyard. Makes for the some serious inspirational fantasizing. C'mon warmer weather!

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  12. Bless his heart!
    There are surely not enough superlatives to describe how beautiful his gardens are.
    Thank you for sharing this here, Jennifer.

    Have a wonderful evening!

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  13. Wow, what an amazing amount of plantings, and not a weed in sight! Obviously Joe loves his garden and puts his soul and body into it. I can see why it is so well known. Gorgeous!

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  14. Jennifer - Joe's plant combinations are superb and the layout of the garden excellent. Imagine! 6,000 plants that he cares for. That's love and passion - not just a hobby. Thanks for letting us see Part 1. I look fwd to your next post.

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  15. What an incredible garden!! I just love how lush and full it is. More fabulousness to keep me inspired. :o)

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  16. I forgot to ask you this important question... Where is Joe's garden? Is it open to the public?
    I reread your article, but didn't find ay information on whereabouts. Thanks

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    1. Joe's garden is in Brampton, Ontario and there is usually an open garden to coincide with the Brampton Horticultural Society's annual garden tour.

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  17. Huge garden, Jennifer!
    Love this Hydrangea 'Annabelle', it's for my zone 5a. Does Joe cover it for wintering?

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    1. I have to pay Joe a visit to have him identify of few of the roses that I photographed and so I will ask him when I am there if he covers his Annabelle hydrangea. Stand by for the answer Nadezda...

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    2. Nadezda, Annabelle blooms on new wood and so Joe cuts his hydrangea to the ground each spring. He doesn't do anything to protect the old wood.

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  18. What a fantastic garden you showed Jennifer. You amaze me how great the overvieuw photo's are. When I try to make one it looks like nothing, Like a have wind is blowing, ore me shaking the camera. My true compliments.
    Have a wonderful day.

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  19. Joe's garden is amazing. So many beautiful flowers. It's very peaceful looking.

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  20. Quel beau jardin bien entretenu. Quel plaisir de découvrir de nouvelles plantes avec tous les détails et conseils que vous donnez. Merci pour le partage. Bonne journée.

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  21. There is nothing more appealing than a well loved garden. Joe must be a wonderful human being.

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  22. That looks like a garden you'd really be tempted to linger in, just to check out all of the plants!

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  23. PS His garden is beautiful and I really enjoyed your pictures!

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  24. Well what is the secret to Joe's climbing hydrangea? Their slow growth is why I haven't brought one home. This is one of my favorite gardens you have featured. It is well designed and beautiful and I love the little things like the hostas draping over the pathways.

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    1. Stacy, Everything I have heard or read about Climbing Hydrangeas suggests that they take about 2 to 3 years to establish and then they take off nicely. They also like fairly moist conditions to really prosper.

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  25. What a fantastic garden, could you give me a rough idea of its size? In particular his back garden. Going back in to have another look at his fabulous planting, and at your wonderful blog which I only just discovered.

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    1. This house is in a slightly upscale neighbourhood and the houses are on the large size. I am guessing the backyard is maybe 60'w x 80' or 100' deep.

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  26. Because visit your blog , I like the Pinterest.

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